CLAY SIEGALL, ADCETRIS’ BRAINCHILD

He has the ambition of growing his company to greatness owing to the long list of drugs in the companies’ pipeline. Clay Siegall, Seattle Genetics’ co-founder, the board of directors’ Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer, has expressed ambitions of venturing into the international market beyond just making drugs. His companies’ valuation has risen significantly over the years. It registered a 46% rise in sales in 2016 from 2014 and an increased in its investment in research by 46% during the same period.

In spite of the challenging economic and political climates, Clay Siegall has expressed optimism on the growth of the company and success in the war against cancer. He remains passionate about making drugs but insists that it is not easy.

Among his company’s successful drugs are; Adcetris aimed at Hodgkin lymphoma, 33A targeted at Acute Myeloid Leukemia, 22ME targeted at bladder cancer and other urothelial cancers and LIV1 targeted at breast cancer. These drugs, commonly known as Antibody-Drug Conjugate, work by embodying themselves on antigens and delivering toxins into cancerous cells and thereby killing them.

Clay attributes his success in entrepreneurship to lessons learned in his early years working in a laboratory. He learned never to take no for an answer. He is also greatly motivated by Wayne Gretzky’s quote: ‘you lose 100% of the shots you don’t take.’ Moreover, unlike other biotech companies, Clay has not banked all his bets on one or two drugs. He instead has 11 different medications in his pipeline.

Watching his father battle cancer for five years, Clay Siegall noted a niche in the oncological industry. He developed a sense of the need to improve the oncologists’ tools (by the development of target drugs) and a passion for helping patients. He pursued a Bachelor of Science degree in Zoology at the University of Maryland and progressed to earn himself a Genetics doctorate from GWU.

Dr. Clay Siegall has an incredible 30-year experience record in the industry having worked with numerous companies. He worked with the National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health for three years from 1988. Afterward, he joined Bristol-Myers Squibb where he worked in their institute of pharmaceutical research for six years ending in 1997.

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